Redwood Journal

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In this week's blog we take a look at the origin of baseball and the deep ties Rhode Island has with it.

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We take a look back on John Brown's infamous raid on Harpers Ferry and his reflections on the failed raid, courtesy of a letter written from John Brown to his cousin Rev. Luther Humphrey on November 19, 1859 from the Redwood Special Collections. Click here to read more!

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Ann Smith Franklin was the first female Newspaper editor in America and founder of the Newport Mercury.

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 We are kicking off Banned Books Week with a list of our favorite classic banned books. Celebrate your freedom to read this week!

 

Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein

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The Great New England Hurricane of 1938 is the deadliest storm to ever hit the coasts of New England, accounting for over 600 fatalities (Rhode Island experienced the highest number), damaged or destroyed over 57,000 homes, and caused property losses estimated at $306 million by the time it dissipated. Trees and buildings damaged by the storm could still be seen in the 1950s   Many New England residents were unprepared for the devastating storm, with the forecast only calling for overcast skies.

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Anne Hutchinson, a rebellious religious leader and one of the founders of Portsmouth, Rhode Island, made her arrival in the American colonies on September 18, 1634, 382 years ago as of this weekend. In July of that year, Anne, with her husband William and their children, left England on the Griffin to follow the Puritan Minister John Cotton to the Massachusetts Bay Colony.

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     On Wednesday, September 14, John Tschirch returns for part three of the of his four part lecture series “The Great English House.”  His third talk, "Chippendale Masterpiece: Dumfries House", will focus on the interior furnishings of Dumfries House, a Palladian style Scottish country house built by Robert and John Adam. Inside Robert Adam would work his magic in the Rococo style while the Earl of Dumfries, who commissioned the house with the hopes it may attract a new wife, handpicked the furniture from Thomas Chippendale’s workshop in the heart of London.

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The Battle of Lake Erie is considered one of the most influential naval battles of the War of 1812. On the morning of September 10, 1813, a squadron on nine American vessels under the command of Master Commandant Oliver Hazard Perry would be approached by a British squadron of six vessels under Commander Robert Barclay. The resulting gun fight between the two squadrons would have an almost immediate effect on not only the Lake Erie campaign, but to the War of 1812 as a whole.

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 Three years after the new United States gained its independence from Great Britain a new set of challenges faced the infant country. Held together by the hastily made Articles of Confederation, the new nation slowly moved into the postbellum years that saw the strings of the union of states under a larger federal government become strained under the process of tax collection.

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The late nineteenth and early twentieth century was the golden age of transatlantic travel. With the onset of the steam powered engine, these ships would become larger and faster eventually leading to the construction of the luxary liners, such as the Queen Mary, and the Normandie. Find out more about this fascinating age by checking out one of the books below!

 

 

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